By the Blouin News Technology staff

Enterprise world ill-prepared for cloud-heavy future

by in Enterprise Tech.

A symbolic data cloud is seen at the IBM stand at the 2014 CeBIT in Germany. Nigel Treblin/Getty Images

A symbolic data cloud is seen at the IBM stand at the 2014 CeBIT in Germany. Nigel Treblin/Getty Images

It has been tough for some enterprises to adjust to the changing information technology landscape; virtual technologies have begun to revolutionize the way IT is structured for businesses, especially with the introduction of cloud-based services. By now, businesses are aware of the benefits of cloud computing versus the complications it brings, but according to new research from IBM, the awareness does not correspond with the enterprises’ willingness to jump aboard the cloud bandwagon. The mobile and social media bandwagons present challenges as well, although different ones.

VISUAL CONTEXT: FUTURE I.T. EXPENDITURE

Source: IDC

Source: IDC

IBM’s full research will be available in July, but the preliminary findings show that only 10% of businesses are ready for the “new IT”, or the pending incorporation of cloud, mobile, social, and big data. The company interviewed 750 CTOs, CIOs and other technology executives in 18 countries and 19 industries, only to find that 90% of them felt as though their organizations are ill-prepared for the next wave of IT infrastructure.

Keep in mind it behooves IBM to report that businesses need help bringing on cloud computing infrastructure, and other networking needs. The technology giant has accelerated its efforts in improving its network offerings to tailor to the new generation of IT — one that includes virtual tech and mobile elements. IBM’s work including big data and the cloud is relevant. The company just added big data analytics as a cloud service, saying that this new project will help automate data analytics to make big data seem less daunting. IBM’s cloud strategy has launched it to the forefront of the enterprise cloud sector. Indeed, the company was just named number one among enterprise cloud computing providers, according to the findings of a recent International Data Corporation study. Not to say that IBM’s data could be skewed, but it doesn’t hurt to report a grave need for enterprise IT overhaul when the company itself provides such services.

But enterprise executives cannot entirely be blamed for their lack of preparedness for the pending wave of new IT. Their original infrastructures built off legacy systems were expensive, they are trying to meld understanding of on-site systems with remote, off-premise ones, and the reinstated fears around virtual technologies are more real than they have ever been since Edward Snowden shed light on the data-culling practices of various governments. The cloud computing market is forecasted to take a significant hit over the next several years, as it had just started to become more mainstream when the NSA leaks spooked many enterprises from considering it as an alternative to their aging legacy systems, or at least as an additional method of storage and operation. Only 22% of those surveyed in IBM’s research report having developed a clear IT roadmap to navigate the next few years of changing infrastructure technology.