By the Blouin News Politics staff

Struggling Nepal eyes tourism one year after quake

by in Asia-Pacific.

The aftermath of the April 25, 2015 earthquake in Nepal. (Source: Domenico/flickr)

The aftermath of the April 25, 2015 earthquake in Nepal. (Source: Domenico/flickr)

Monday marked the one year anniversary of a devastating earthquake that struck Nepal, and major problems remain. Reconstruction has been plagued by delays, and of the $4.4 billion pledged globally, only about $2.8 billion has been delivered. Even worse, most of that has not even been spent.

Much of the blame lies with the Nepalese government. Granted, it was overwhelmed by the scale of damage, including 600,000 homes destroyed and 950,000 children left without schools. No one expected a return to pre-quake levels of infrastructure anytime soon. But the bureaucratic pace has been glacial, undoubtedly exacerbated by corruption at various levels. Only now – after an entire year —  has the government come up with a plan to construct earthquake-resistant houses. Kathmandu is finishing up ​lists of who is eligible for government subsidies, according to CBC News, and on Monday — for the first time ​since the earthquake — NGOs were at last ​granted permission to build things other than temporary housing.

Calling the delays unfortunate, the government blamed a constitutional crisis that occurred in September…

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